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Use of Schoolcraft e-mails become mandatory

By Jackie Charniga
Editor in Chief

When students check their e-mails in the morning before class they will have to be sure they have logged onto the right account.

Starting May 5, Schoolcraft will send out updates exclusively through the assigned e-mail addresses that were created for each student upon admission. All that apply for, or are currently enrolled in, classes will receive an automatic message to their Schoolcraft e-mail stating that this this will be the College’s preferred form of communication going forward.

Schoolcraft anticipates that defaulting to one uniform account per student will ensure the reception of important messages about classes, financial aid, school closings, and other vital information sent out by the college.

Though this seems to be an abrupt change in policy, this has been considered in the past.

According to Cathy McCardell, Director of Registration Services, there was a long-standing issue of missing e-mails that needed to be rectified.

“The decision for this change is many years in the making. Important e-mails, especially automatic e-mail responses for temporary passwords, were being lost to spam folders. All offices in Student Services have been pushing for the preferred e-mail.”

Spearheaded by the combined effort of the Head of Marketing, Vice President of Student Services, and the offices of Financial Aid, Registration, Records, and IT, this change will be an asset to the Schoolcraft community.

Instructors, especially those operating through Blackboard, are required to use their assigned e-mails as well. “We need to make sure students and instructors are who they say they are. If you have a Schoolcraft e-mail, we know that you are affiliated with the college,” McCardell said.

“The Schoolcraft e-mails are the best way to communicate,” said Frank Ruggirello Jr., Director of Marketing and Communications at Schoolcraft. “We need to know that students are getting the messages.”

There will be advertisements through an online campaign on Schoolcraft’s website, as well as through social media sites, informing students of this change. Ruggirello said, “We don’t want students to be surprised by this, especially not current students.”

The implementation of the new policy was delayed to benefit the students. Schoolcraft students needed to become familiar with the e-mails before their exclusive use became mandatory.  Over two years ago, focus groups that consisted of Schoolcraft students were first formed to test the efficiency of the current e-mail system.  “Most colleges go the route of personal student e-mail accounts,” Ruggirello said. “We first had to learn from their mistakes.”

If students would like to continue using their preferred e-mails, they must log into their Schoolcraft e-mail and forward them to their original account. However this is not encouraged by faculty, due to the additional spam folders that could separate students from necessary information. “The college is not responsible for any missing e-mails,” stated McCardell.

Despite this, students are rather attached to their personal e-mails. Danielle Sheeran, a current Schoolcraft student, said, “The thing I like most about the Schoolcraft e-mail is that you can forward it to any e-mail you choose and it sends the message to both.”

When McCardell addressed the issue of students in possession of multiple e-mail accounts, she said, “It does not matter to us where the messages are ultimately sent. What is most important to the college is that e-mails are being received.”

If students are having any issues regarding the e-mails, they are to contact the Answer Center Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-11 p.m., Sat 7 a.m.-11 p.m. and Sun 7 a.m.-9 p.m. at 734-462-4426 and through their e-mail, answers@schoolcraft.edu/.