Rap is crap

Popular rap lyrics negatively impact listeners

By Elaine Gerou, Managing Editor.

By Elaine Gerou, Managing Editor.

Rap music is dominated by male rappers, with few female rappers in the game such as Nicki Minaj and Iggy Azalea. The songs the genre produces can be catchy with hard rhymes and nice flow, but the messages it often portrays are derogatory, and unfortunately influence listeners to applaud and imitate ignorance.

Rap glorifies sex, drugs and money. There is nothing wrong with enjoying sex, but portraying women as sexual objects is wrong. Drugs are many times beneficial to its users, but the abuse of drugs rappers preach about is not good for one’s body, mind or spirit, and the abuse also negatively impacts the people in the user’s life. There is nothing wrong with liking money because it is difficult to go anywhere, do anything or eat any food without it, but broadcasting money as the most important value in life is a lie.

“F*** b******, get money” is a common phrase tossed around lightly in rap culture, and its loose interpretation shows listeners that money is more important than anything else. Money is merely a concept though, and dollars are only representations of what money is worth. It is all imaginary; the money one has in his or her bank account is not physical, and nobody needs money to live. People need food, air, water and love to live. Love comes from companionship. Family and friends should be more important than money, because when one has no money, they usually only have friends and family. Sure some rappers have real life situations of unfortunate family situations, but their stories should not encourage listeners with good families to put money over their family.

Rap also tells listeners that drugs are awesome. “Pop a molly I’m sweating,” are the lyrics of Trinidad James’ “All Gold Everything.” Tyga, Kayne West, French Montana, Rick Ross, Nicki Minaj and several other rap artists also mention the drug in their songs. While those songs were top hits on the radio, it seemed that there was an increase in people using the drug because of the songs’ influence. Rap promotes many other dangerous drugs that are known to be damaging to the body, such as alcohol and lean (a.k.a. cough syrup).

Rap is also blatant in constantly talking about sex and oral sex in a detailed manner, which is not good to have young listeners hear. This teaches listeners that sex is not intimate and does not need to be with someone special, which inhibits the “on-to the next one” mentality. With this mentality, it not only increases the number of partners individuals sleep with, but also increases the chances of obtaining an STD or having an unwanted pregnancy, which are beneficial in no way. The parents usually cannot support the child properly and either put the child into foster care or the family on government aid, and every taxpayer pays for the carelessness.

Another annoying thing rappers promote is cheating and claiming other men’s women. In Trey Songz’ “Smart Phones,” he sings about how his girlfriend caught him cheating, and he says he will tell her any lie to keep her, not being man enough to tell her the truth. This encourages not only cheating, but also lying, which is bad because lies usually only lead to more problems. Jeremih’s song “Don’t Tell Em” says, “I got a missed call from your b****,” and proceeds to talk about the sexual things she wants to do with the rapper rather than her boyfriend. Majority of women do not think this way, and this shows rappers are ego centric. Messing with someone else’s significant other is not okay because it will get both the cheater and outside party into trouble with the person cheated on.

One of the worst things rap has done though, is create the dance called “twerking.” This is the dumbest dance that women can do to show men that they are sexual toys. The shaking of booty fat may be a turn-on for men, but it should not be videoed and put on YouTube for the world to see, nor should it be done in public. That behavior is “ratchet” or in other words, obnoxious, slutty, gross and ghetto.

The worst part about this sex-crazed genre though is rappers bragging about what is inside their pants: its’ size and how well it works in bed. It is sickening because nobody cares, but the rappers think everyone cares.

Lyrics referring to women as “hoes,” “b-words,” “thots” or “tricks,” and seeming to only value women for their sexual assets is wrong. Any man that feels that way deserves no intimacy, nor can he handle it with his boyish mentality. Rap shows men that it is “ok” to call women derogatory names, but ironically, many of the black rappers inappropriately referring to women curse the n-word repeatedly with pride and expect no one of a different race to call them the derogatory term. This is hypocritical—do not spoon out medicine that cannot be swallowed by one’s self.

While rap can be extremely fun to jam to at times, it is vital that its messages are not taken literally by its listeners. This should be taught to all people at a young age by parents and music teachers. If rap’s messages continue to influence behavior, society will not improve in the aspects of mentality on drugs, sex and money.