A whole news world

Increased online readability makes now the most exciting time in journalism

Lauren Lukens editor-in-chief lauren.lukens@apps.schoolcraft.edu

Lauren Lukens
editor-in-chief
lauren.lukens@apps.schoolcraft.edu

Everyone with a smartphone carries Internet access, which holds the gateway to an encyclopedia, dictionary and library of human knowledge in the palm of their hands. Due to the accessibility of WiFi and Internet plans, it is commonly believed that good ol’ fashioned print newspapers and books are going extinct.

People interested in working for news outlets are turned off when hearing rumors of print media vanishing, and they often sacrifice passion for security when turning to more practical job opportunities.

While concerns of people being too lazy to pick up a print newspaper or book and the price of ink and paper are realistic, it is absurd to think that these means of news and entertainment are dying out entirely in an age of extraordinary media growth. In fact, now could be the most interesting time since the birth of newspapers in 1690 to get involved with the news industry.

From World War I until television became popular in the 1950s, movie theatres showed short films containing current events, called newsreels. By the 1970s, about 60 percent of America watched one of the big three network news programs—CBS, NBC or ABC— every day, according to “Mass Media in a Changing World” by George Rodman. Since then, news has increasingly been delivered on demand on the Web. Keep in mind that someone being published on a professional news site still has to go out and report on events, articles must be fact-checked and graphics must go along with stories, all requiring paid jobs in the industry.

As someone who has an indescribable passion for writing, communication and the media as a whole, it does not matter where the future of print publications go; I just want to be a part of the transition. Newspapers, authors and publishers will follow readers. As older generations who prefer to read print become obsolete, news will be found primarily on the Internet. If the public prefers to listen to news by audio or visually on their cell phones, news businesses will adjust. Even if paper publications go obsolete, there will be a demand to read and stay up-to-date, so the need for reporters and other entertainment writers will not deplete.

The reality is that publishing stories, advertisements and images in print are costly and ineffective, which limits the amount of information available in a particular newspaper or magazine. Online media allows news sources to publish several times a day, which means information is essentially limitless. With rises in access to information and easy, free publishing on the Web, creating a desire for marketers to invest in online advertising, jobs in the media can only grow.

PHOTO BY AP  PRESS READER BLOG With new types of technology and the continual need for current events, journalism will stay in business, but news will increasingly be read on items such as tablets, cell phones and laptops instead of print newspapers.

PHOTO BY AP
PRESS READER BLOG
With new types of technology and the continual need for
current events, journalism will stay in business, but news will increasingly be read on items such as tablets, cell phones and laptops instead of print newspapers.

Those who aspire to pursue a job in the media should not be afraid to take the risk. My advice to those who love writing is to be flexible and gain experience outside a college classroom. If interested in writing, also learn the basics of photography and design. Do not get too attached to one style of writing, as most news is brief and straight to the point. Most importantly, join a campus newspaper or similar group that will stand out on a resume before earning a degree.

News is referred to as information that is timely, important and interesting to its readers. Journalists believe that the most important news reports about public affairs, government activities and politics. The fact of the matter is those such topics, along with fashion, sports and other news, will continue to appeal to people around the world.

As long as there is a demand for knowledge, there will be a desire for those brave enough to publish the inside scoop of diverse topics. Writers should use the access of technology to their advantage rather than letting it scare them away from their dream career, and those uninterested in journalism should have the same outlook for their passion.

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