Baseball’s biggest embarrassment

Alex Rodriguez needs to retire

Nick Misiak sports editor nicholas.misiak@apps.schoolcraft.edu

Nick Misiak
sports editor
nicholas.misiak@apps.schoolcraft.edu

New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez recently apologized to the Yankee organization and Major League Baseball for his use of performance enhancing drugs (PED) during his early playing career. The 14-time All-Star admitted to using PEDs during his tenure in Seattle, Texas and in the first half of his stint as a Yankee in an interview with ESPN in 2009. He was suspended for the entire 2014 season for his involvement in a biogenesis scandal that accused him of taking human growth hormones (HGH) and testosterone.

Rodriguez’s apology is a load of bologna sandwich. The only reason he would apologize for his actions would be to improve his public image, which is already severely tainted due to his use of banned substances.

If A-Rod were to really apologize to baseball, he would walk his drug weathered, 39-year-old ass in front of a podium and announce his retirement. Major League Baselball needs to move on from the tainted “Steroid Era” that still haunts the integrity and credibility of the league.

Other superstars from that era, such as Jose Conseco, Mark McGuire, Sammy Sosa, Raphael Palmeiro and Barry Bonds, have also admitted to juicing up, so Rodriguez is not the first player to be in a situation where his tremendous offensive numbers are tainted, but he is “the last of the Mohicans.” His retirement wouldn’t end the scrutiny over PEDs in baseball, but it would remove the largest cog in the steroid machine that haunts the sport.

Rodriguez is only picking up a bat this spring in an attempt to come back to baseball to improve his image within the game. He thinks that if he can come back and play well without the help of PEDs that his drug-inflated numbers will still be relevant, but that will never be the case.

Can one blame Rodriguez for taking PEDs though? He began taking them when an estimated 40 percent of players in the league were using, and his incredible play gave him contract offers of $252 million and $270 million in 2000 and 2007. The record-setting pace that he was performing at made him the most popular player and proverbial king of baseball.

Now, A-Rod is a cheater— a fraud. He is an embarrassment to baseball, and he is a reminder of one of baseball’s most embarrassing eras.

So Alex, for the love of the game, please hang up your jersey, take your drug-tainted millions and retire into the sunset as baseball’s most hated player. Besides, it will give you more time to be hand fed popcorn by Cameron Diaz.