Peace needed

Natalie Shirvanian Sports Editor yeran.shirvanian@apps.schoolcraft.edu

Natalie Shirvanian
Sports Editor
yeran.shirvanian@apps.schoolcraft.edu

Violence and anger weakens humanity

“Anger is the enemy of non-violence, and pride is a monster that swallows it up,” said civil rights activist, Mahatma Gandhi.

Fatal crimes have existed for centuries, but the access to smart phones and cameras makes it easier to provide evidence of these tragic events. Young adults’ deaths, primarily African-American males, due to police brutality and uncooperative civilians have put many people in our society in fear of unexpected events on the streets.

Many have posted videos that have gone viral on social media, showing young teens brutally beating each other on the streets and in classrooms while bystanders record the fight on their camera phones.

Entertainment websites, such as Worldstar Hip Hop, promote fights of this nature. As our nation continues to struggle with racism and police brutality, violence continues to grow.

While these stomach-churning videos go viral, it shows the anger built within our society. Racism, sexuality and many other human differences have created an opinionated nation, and social media continuously feeds our minds with opinions based on radical views. There is no such thing as a right or wrong opinion; that belief only stirs the pot to keep human beings opposed to one another. One blatant, regular opposing being covered by the media daily is the opposition between police and African American civilians.

image from sun journal.com Instead of encouraging the use of guns to resolve issues, citizens should find more peaceful alternatives.

image from sun journal.com
Instead of encouraging the use of guns to resolve issues, citizens should find more peaceful alternatives.

Although police officers are supposed to protect and serve, some officers do not keep their promise. Brutal actions from police have been reported throughout the country this year, and although they are not heavily covered locally, the same kinds of occurrences happen in metro Detroit.

In March of this year, an Inkster police officer brutally beat an Inkster man, 57-year-old Floyd Dent. Ex-police officer William Melendez planted cocaine in Dent’s pocket, dragged him out of his vehicle, punched him 16 times and tasered him three times during a traffic stop. The officer was fired and charged, while other officers involved are still under investigation.

With violent acts becoming the norm, it gives other countries the notion that we are an angry, ignorant and uneducated society. After the shooting involving Michael Brown of Ferguson, Missouri, the city rioted causing more devastation— not only for the families involved, but neighboring cities, states and the rest of America.

America struggles each and every day with many issues that involve every race, ethnicity, gender and religion in this country. Our nation has survived damaging events such as 9/11, Hurricane Katrina and various shootings across the U.S.; however, these horrific acts unified us momentarily, but we quickly reverted back to our selfish ways and resorted to violence and prejudice views to release anger.

Media plays a tremendous role in elevating such hate and violence. Once we put our phones down, turn our laptops off and detach our eyes and ears away from televisions and radios, we can finally take our parents’ and teachers’ advice and treat others the way we would like to be treated. Maybe then there will be hope for the human race, once again.