Old wounds reopen

Recent breakthrough in the O.J. Simpson murder trial discovered

By Chris Skarnulis, Arts & Entertainment Editor

Following the outcome of the most sensational murder trial in American history, the O.J. Simpson murder trial, has stirred up a frenzy in American culture. The public is still torn on the supposed innocence of alleged killer O.J. Simpson, accused of murdering his ex-wife and her friend. It’s been a hot topic for debate in pop culture even to this day, leading to a television adaption of the events of the trial, titled “The People v. O.J. Simpson,” on FXX.

OJ Simpson

OJ Simpson sitting in handcuffs during his trial

Simpson, a talented football player, was awarded an athletic scholarship and was a running back for the University of Southern California in 1967 and 1968 under Coach John McKay. He was nominated for the Heisman Trophy his junior year in college, but lost. Following his college football career, Simpson went on to play pro football as a running back for the Buffalo Bills from 1969-1977 and the San Francisco 49ers from 1978-1979.

Simpson was accused of first-degree murder in 1994 as a lead suspect in the murders of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown-Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman. The case gained wide coverage of his A-team of legal advisors including longtime friend Robert Kardashian and fellow lawyer Robert Shapiro, the infamous White Bronco chase, as well as frequent drama among Simpson, his family and anger from the black community. After a long and highly publicized trial, Simpson was found not guilty and free from all charges.

Recently, the murder trial has made headlines in the news, with new developments occurring. The Los Angeles Police Department reported that a knife was found on Simpson’s estate on Friday, March 4. The LAPD is currently investigating the knife, which was reportedly given to a private investigator working the murder case by a construction worker following Simpson’s acquittal and in the midst of his estate being demolished. The now retired investigator discovered he had it, and handed the evidence to the police to undergo testing.

Police are unsure as to why the investigator kept the knife a secret for years, but was examined for DNA evidence and blood samples from the victims, but came to the conclusion that the knife was not likely the murder weapon. Medical examiners are under the belief that the knife was too short in length to have murdered the victims, but also found no traces of neither Simpson nor Goldman’s blood.