Gather ’round the table

Celebrating the Thanksgiving season

By The Schoolcraft Connection Editorial Staff

Thanksgiving is a time of year full of many festivities that can warm the hearts of all. Some choose to spend it at church, or volunteering to help those of the less fortunate, celebrating with close family or friends among other things. Nov. 24 is a day full of fabulous parades all over the country, annual football games for the sports fans, food galore, spending time with family and celebrating the true meaning of the season.

Arguably the best or worst part of Thanksgiving, depending on whom one asks, is getting together with family. Whether someone goes to his or her aunt’s, grandma or mom’s house they are sure to be greeted by the distant family they haven’t seen since last year. Most of the men will be gathered around the TV watching their local Football team play while the women will be either helping cook for the feast or catching up on each others lives, there is sure to be commotion in the house. However, once the dinner bell is rung the best part about gathering with the family is sitting around the table, sharing laughs and memories as food is passed from person to person.

This food is the reason everyone looks forward to Thanksgiving for weeks before it’s near. As family rolls into the driveway, the smell of turkey, stuffing, potatoes and pie permeates from the doorways of homes across the country. No one really comes to hear about the boring stories that your old aunt has; people come to dinner because the pie that family members bring makes listening to the stories more bearable. Pumpkin pie, green bean casserole and turkey aren’t usually around all year, so that makes the one occasion where everyone can eat as much as they want of the fantastic delicacies. The stomachache and lethargic, tired moods afterwards are all worth it for the ridiculous amount of food there is.

Turkey dinner

The turkey dinner with all the fixings is what many of us look forward to the most throughout the year. (Photo from pixabay.com)

There are many things that make Thanksgiving Day one of the greatest days of the year. One of the best parts is football. Especially being from the state of Michigan, the Detroit Lions are one of two teams that are lucky enough to have an annual Thanksgiving Day game every year. This year the Lions will be playing the Minnesota Vikings who are first place in the NFC North and will make a very interesting game. Other National Football league games airing will be the Dallas Cowboys against the Washington Redskins and the Indianapolis Colts against the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Another rewarding quality of Thanksgiving is celebrating the history and heritage surrounding the holiday. The story about Squanto and the Pilgrims is classic. It is a story of religion, unity and family. Perhaps the best part about this story is the heartwarming message behind it. It displays two separate people uniting to share a meal together. This story sends a strong message of the importance of giving thanks. It gives reason to celebrate the notion of the importance of family. This goes together with the heritage of people and how they celebrate it. History is the most important element to enrich the mind and remember the true meaning of the holiday.

After a day of feasting, reconnecting (or fighting) among families and other festivities the long awaited day of deals shortly arrives as the clock strikes midnight and Friday Nov. 25 has begun. All month the deals are built up so that Black Friday can be made more exciting than the year before. The long lines, long hours and fight to find the best deal possible will begin as quickly as the day of thanks has passed. It is one of the best times to get one’s entire Christmas list of presents to friends and family members out of the way.

No matter what one’s favorite part of the day is, either the food, football or just being together with everyone they love, Thanksgiving Day is the best day of the month and probably one of the best holidays of the year. It has much to offer and is engrained in the history of America.