Where is the line drawn?

Censorship on television has disappeared

Crumpled banner saying "Parental Advisory Explicit Content."

As censorship on television diminishes, today’s culture seems to continues to disappear with it. (Image from Media.Tumblr.com)

Back in the 1950s when tele­vision was first mainstreamed in households shows that aired contained stereotypical gen­der roles, rigid animation and goofy music. When cinema was first created, the pictures were innocent and entertaining; however, through the turning of the centuries television has began to show grotesque kill­ing, intimate sex scenes and explicit language. Although this seems to just be the norm of the generation, it seems to be having devastating effects on the audiences watching.

Back when music television ceased to exist artists such as Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Elvis Presley concerts were streamed to those who owned television sets. While the ac­tions of Elvis Presley seem in­nocent now, back in the 1950s and 60s Elvis Presley could not be shown from the waist down due to the obscenity of his pelvic movements. Howev­er, if people compare Presley’s dances to the intimate circum­stances shown on television today such as the sex scenes in “Game of Thrones” and “True Blood” the level of which con­tent that is too inappropriate for younger viewers has drastical­ly changed. Moments that were previously censored to young­er viewers, like sex scenes, are now aired on primetime televi­sion for anyone to view.

Another aspect of television that has changed dramati­cally over the decades is the language of television shows. Back during the “Golden Age” of television it was rare for the characters to say “Damn” or any other explicit term. Howev­er, it wasn’t until the 1980s that characters on television start­ed to use more adult language. But it wasn’t until the 1990’s that the language of individ­uals became mainstream in society with the help of ani­mated series like “The Simp­sons” and “South Park.” When the animated show “South Park” debuted on television in the mid-90s, the language that the fourth-graders in the show were speaking appalled parents. Whether it was Eric Cartman making fun of Kyle Broflovski for being Jewish or Kenny McCormick being ruthlessly scorned for being poor, these children have no filters when it comes to ex­plicit language. As television continued to evolve, shows such as “Breaking Bad” and “Better Call Saul” were given permission to use the F-word twice each season that they aired. The worst of the words were allowed to be said for the first time on mainstream television since it’s creation. If the sex scenes were not bad enough, the language of the new generation of television is sure to frustrate viewers around the country.

One of the main things that throw viewers off watching their favorite shows is the gro­tesque nature of some of the killings on the shows. Recently “The Walking Dead” aired its season seven premiere and the events that followed shocked viewers so bad they threatened to never watch the show again. The villain on the show named Negan (played by Jeffery Dean Morgan) brutally battered two of the shows main characters by bashing their heads in with his barbwire baseball bat he named “Lucille.” The scenes that aired were so disgusting audiences around the country turned the channel and vowed to never watch the show again. If people compared that scene to the horror movies such as “Halloween” and “Friday the 13th” that still air in October the murders are performed much differently. In these classic Halloween movies the victims are shown right be­fore they are murdered, and then right after, without ever showing the blood and gore audiences are accustomed to seeing today.

Some people may argue that television is adapting to its au­dience, but the other side of the argument is that the audience is adapting to its new televi­sion. If television is to continue with such success as it has had as of late, then shows are going to have to continue get rid of their censorship.

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